2017 Lethbridge International Airshow Is Set To Stun

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Canadian Forces Snowbirds

There are some exciting new changes coming to the Lethbridge International Airshow in Lethbridge, Alberta this July 14th-16th. With a number of jet performers and a night show added, Lethbridge is proving to be a show you won’t want to miss!

Show Weekend
An extra day has been added to bring more aviation fun to the weekend. The gates on Friday will open at 4:00PM with the new night show starting at 7:00PM, wrapping up at 11:00PM. The afterburners will be lit and the fireworks bursting as the night routines from the performer lineup light up the night sky!

For Saturday and Sunday, the gates will open at 9:00AM with flying starting at 1:00PM and closing at 6:00PM.

Ace Maker T-33 Shooting Star Smoke-N-Thunder JetCar Race Aviation Nation 2016 Nellis AFB Las Vegas NevadaUS Army Golden Knights

Performers
There will be plenty of action in the skies over Lethbridge this year. The Canadian Forces Snowbirds are to take the stage once more, along with the absolutely gorgeous CF-18 Hornet Demo Team. A rare 1950s-era de Havilland DH-115 Mk.55 Vampire jet, Greg “Wired” Colyer’s T-33 Shooting Star “Ace Maker II,” and the Dornier AlphaJet of Mustang High Flight Aerobatics will round out the jet warbird lineup. Aerobatics from Geoff Latter in his Nanchang CJ-6A, Red Bull Air Racer Pete McLeod with his racing Edge 540, and Joe Shetterly’s RV-8 of Rifle Airshows are sure to impress throughout the show weekend. The US Army Golden Knights parachute team will also be in attendance, demonstrating that jumping out of a perfectly good airplane is just as exciting as flying one.

However, not all of the excitement will be in the air this year. Bill Braack of Smoke-N-Thunder will be there in his jet-powered car to challenge another performer to a sprint race, as well as Precision Exotics in their 2007 Lamborghini Gallardo and 2007 Ferrari F430.

Static Display
An ambitious and exciting list for the static display requested for the show has been published to the website, with new confirmed attendees coming in every week. Currently, a Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CH-146 Griffon, United States Air Force (USAF) C-130J Super Hercules, Transport Canada’s National Aerial Surveillance de Havilland/Bombardier DHC-8 Dash 8, and the Commemorative Air Force’s (CAF) Arizona Airbase North American B-25J Mitchell “Maid In The Shade” are set to appear this year. Potential static displays at this time include exciting features such as a USAF AC-130 Spectre gunship, US Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey, RCAF CC-177 Globemaster III, and a new US Navy P-8 Poseidon. Stay tuned as more static displays are confirmed!

USN P-8 Poseidon Navy NAS Whidbey Island Washington WA Static DisplayCC-115 Buffalo Static Display Abbotsford International Airshow 2015

With some fresh faces and valued old friends coming to the Lethbridge International Airshow this year, it promises to be one of the must-see shows of the season. You can go to lethbridgeairshow.ca for more information about the event and follow us here at AirshowStuff as we work with the show to bring you some amazing coverage!

One Response

  1. Some more info about Bombardier Dash 8 from Wikipedia.

    The Bombardier Dash 8 or Q-Series, previously known as the de Havilland Canada Dash 8 or DHC-8, is a series of twin-engine, medium-range, turboprop airliners. Introduced by de Havilland Canada (DHC) in 1984, they are now produced by Bombardier Aerospace. Over 1,000 Dash 8s of all models have been built.

    The Dash 8 was developed from the de Havilland Canada Dash 7, which featured extreme short take-off and landing (STOL) performance. With the Dash 8, DHC focused on improving cruise performance and lowering operational costs. The engine chosen was the Pratt & Whitney Canada PW100. The aircraft has been delivered in four series. The Series 100 has a maximum capacity of 39, the Series 200 has the same capacity but offers more powerful engines, the Series 300 is a stretched, 50-seat version, and the Series 400 is further stretched to 78 passengers. Models delivered after 1997 have cabin noise suppression and are designated with the prefix “Q”. Production of the Series 100 ceased in 2005, and the Q200 and Q300 in 2009.

    In the 1970s, de Havilland Canada had invested heavily in its Dash 7 project, concentrating on STOL and short-field performance, the company’s traditional area of expertise. Using four medium-power engines with large four-bladed propellers resulted in comparatively lower noise levels, which combined with its excellent STOL characteristics, made the Dash 7 suitable for operating from small in-city airports, a market DHC felt would be compelling. However, only a handful of air carriers employed the Dash 7, as most regional airlines were more interested in operational costs than short-field performance.

    In 1980, de Havilland responded by dropping the short-field performance requirement and adapting the basic Dash 7 layout to use only two, more powerful engines. Its favoured engine supplier, Pratt & Whitney Canada, developed the new PW100 series engines for the role, more than doubling the power from its PT6. Originally designated the PT7A-2R engine, it later became the PW120. When the Dash 8 rolled out on April 19, 1983, more than 3,800 hours of testing had been accumulated over two years on five PW100 series test engines. Certification of the PW120 followed in late 1983.

    Distinguishing features of the Dash 8 design are the large T-tail intended to keep the tail free of prop wash during takeoff, a very high aspect ratio wing, the elongated engine nacelles also holding the rearward-folding landing gear, and the pointed nose profile. First flight was on June 20, 1983, and the airliner entered service in 1984 with NorOntair. In 1984, Piedmont Airlines, formerly Henson Airlines, was the first US customer for the Dash 8.

    The Dash 8 design has better cruise performance than the Dash 7, is less expensive to operate, and is much less expensive to maintain, due largely to having only two engines. It is a little noisier than the Dash 7 and cannot match the STOL performance of its earlier DHC forebears, although it is still able to operate from small airports with 3,000 ft (910 m) runways, compared to the 2,200 ft (670 m) required by a fully laden Dash 7.

    In April 2008, Bombardier announced that production of the classic versions (Series 100, 200, 300) would be ended, leaving the Series 400 as the only Dash 8 still in production. A total of 671 Dash 8 classics were produced; the last one was delivered to Air Nelson in May 2008.

    At the February 2016, Singapore Airshow, Bombardier announced a high density 90-seat layout of the Q400 which should enter service in 2018: keeping the 28 in (71 cm) seat pitch of the Nok Air 86-seats, an extra row of seats is allowed by changing the configuration of the front right-hand door and moving back the aft pressure bulkhead. The payload is increased by 2,000 pounds (910 kg) and the aircraft maintenance check intervals are increased: 800 hours from 600 for an A-check and 8,000 hours from 6,000 for a C-check.

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